Smart Repair > Midi-Repair >

Articles > Video Articles >

Can smart repair really
save you money? (Prt 1)

The benefits of a Smart Repair Vs a Bodyshop, and the downsides to both.

vID:062
Duration: 08:32
Size: 122mb
Download FLV
Video Transcript

Gary:
So can you do smart repair anywhere on a car?

Matt:
I wouldn't recommend it, I'd stick to smaller areas, bumpers are fine, but when it comes to things like the middle of doors, bonnets, I wouldn't recommend it. Because of the environment that a smart repairer works in, panels like bonnets, roofs, I'd recommend going to a bodyshop.

Gary:
So it's not a miracle cure for all damage?

Matt:
No, no, no.

Gary:
Presumably this is convenience, and if you have just a scuff, which most cars have.

Matt:
Yeah, scuffs are fine, even strips on the doors are fine. But if it's on part of the door then I'd recommend a bodyshop.

Gary:
Okay, I see what you mean.

***

Gary:
So there's the damage on the corner there which is only about the size of a big grapefruit, so which bit do you intend to paint there Matt?

Matt:
I'm going to fade it out to about here. I'm going to follow this line which fades out here, I'll try and lose the lacquer to there. On this side I'll bring it down to here and lose the lacquer about here.

***

Gary:
What about the atmosphere? Dust and such... how does that effect it?

Matt:
Because of the size of the areas we paint, whether we are indoors or outdoors doesn't make a lot of difference, and because the panels we paint are straight down (vertical) we don't get dirt or grit landing in the paint.

***

Gary:
Just out of interest, why are you rubbing it down before you have masked it up?

Matt:
If you blow all the dust off, and you mask it up before, you could get all the dust in there and sticking to the tape.

***

Gary:
So what is that you are doing there then?

Matt:
Covering up the parking sensor so as not to get any paint on it. If you paint the sensors, the sensitivity decreases as you use them.

***

Matt:
How we mix the colours is that we take the paint code off the vehicle. We have a program on the laptop, where we type in the code, and it comes up with the formula which gives you the measurements for all the different colours.

Gary:
How does that compare with the bodyshop on the colour side?

Matt:
The mix of the colour is exactly the same as the bodyshop, we just mix it in smaller dosages.

Gary:
That's you mixing the paint now for this BMW?

Matt:
That's correct, yeah.

Gary:
What about the lacquers then, how do they compare? The colour is exactly the same, just a smaller scale, the lacquers are...?

Matt:
The lacquers are very similar, but the stuff we use is more environmentally friendly because of the environments we work in, we use a non-isocyanide two-pack lacquer whereas a bodyshop would possibly use an isocyanide based lacquer.

Gary:
So the finished end result is the same is it?

Matt:
Exactly the same, the quality of the stuff we use is exactly the same as the bodyshop. But the lacquers we use, because they are non-isocyanide, they are more expensive than the bodyshop.

***

Scott:
You get a line across here, when it's blue, you can pour quite a bit because there's a fair bit to go. I'll show you on the next one...

Gary:
I see, it's giving you an indicator of of when it's nearly... otherwise you could end up putting too much in. Kind of like when you are filling your car up, you want to put twenty pounds in, and you've got twenty pounds in your pocket, you have to slow down near the end.

Scott:
Exactly, you don't want to go over!

Gary:
Paint is the same thing... interesting!

Scott:
If you do go over quite a bit, you can recalculate the whole mix. That would mean mixing up quite a bit more sometimes.

Gary:
But it's got a way of doing that.

Scott:
You can get out of it.

Gary:
That's cleaver.

Scott:
See now I've got the blue line there. This is quite a tricky one. Some colours are more tricky than others.

***

Gary:
It takes a bit of mixing to get it right doesn't it? To get the colour exactly right.

Scott:
Yeah, you have to be quite thorough with it, I mean look how it's all stuck around the side at the moment. You have to give it a good scrape round, to make sure you mix up the right shade.

Gary:
And there's some flashy guns up there, one of them is our's isn't it? The one at the back?

Scott:
Yeah that's one of mine.

Gary:
That's a flashy looking gun... like having your own bowling ball.

Scott:
Yeah.

Gary:
And there's Dave's, the orange one. And who's is the one with the flames?

Scott:
They're all Dave's.

Gary:
Are they? A bit of a fanatic is he?

Scott:
Yeah he loves it, he's getting another one soon.

Gary:
Treat himself to a new gun? Boys and their toys eh?

***

Gary:
Why wouldn't you repair just that area. Why not paint this door and then stop just past there and repair that area?

Davide:
With silver and a lot of modern colours you have to give yourself plenty of room to blend, because there are so many different things and reasons, temperature and application which can make the colour look different. And if you are trying to keep it really, really close...

Gary:
Show me where you mean on that panel.

Davide:
If you were to colour this, you would have to put your silver at least to here, and fade it in, then lacquer a bit further, so it's not much different to lacquer all the way to the end, so you do all the way to the end, and you could come off this line. But then you have primer, colour, lacquer, all on one line, it's too much, you can have a build-up.

Gary:
So you have a bit of a step there? Effectively you want to paint more of the door... so tell me when you are making an even finish down the side of a car, where would you finish the silver?

Davide:
You would fade it in, obviously you have got to have colour here, and you need to blend because you have the yellow there. you will have probably 100% colour to about there, you then reduce it down to about 80%, 50%, and the final part here would have between about 5 and 10%. So the new silver matches the old silver on the wing, and new silver down the side.

Gary:
What would be the effect if I just tried to paint it to there and did a small area like a smart repair?

David:
It might look okay, but the other thing is that the area past it can look dark, because the colour here is wet and here goes on dry and you could end up having a patch. You pull up into a petrol station one day and under the lights you see a patch where it's been blown in and shows up more.

Gary:
So it could look alright initially, you could be lucky.

Davide:
You could be lucky. But after a short period of time, it will show up. But the thing is, there is no point in getting rid of the dent, having it lovely and smooth and having poor paintwork. Then having a patch that you can occasionally see. If you are going to do it, you do it properly.

***

Davide:
So you can see on there where the silver has gone onto the masking, so you've got 100% silver, as it comes along it gradually fades to 75, 50, 25 down to here, you can see on the tape there is no silver at all.

Gary:
So this is how you fade it across the panel and this won't look patchy later.

Davide:
No. And then what you do is put a clear lacquer all the way along. The clear lacquer seals it so you won't see the difference.

GaryGary Wray ~ 20/05/2011

Contents

Both Small Area Repairs (Smart Repair) and Bodyshop Repairs have their place. If you can repair just a small area on a bumper it is obviously cheaper than a bodyshop respray. The downside of Small Area Repairs is that they can only really be done on small areas of the car, regardless of how small the damage. Bodyshop resprays don't suffer from the same limitation, although even small areas of damage can lead to large areas and multiple panels being painted which leads to extra expense and the car being off the road for several days.

Ultimately, the solution is to use both when they are appropriate to ensure that you get the right quality without paying more than you need to.

If you are not sure if you need a Small Area Repair or a Bodyshop Repair, then send us a photo through Ask the Experts ~
Send us a photo and we will tell you the best way to fix it.

Davide Morena of Kraftwork is a member of our panel of experts.
top

Related Videos

Megane Bumper Scuff Repair
Bumper Scuff - Audi
Nissan 350ZX - Pantless Dent Removal
'Don't worry, It'll polish out'
This page was last updated on Tue, 1 October, 2013
Car Care Videos

Est 1987

Visitors Since
Dec 2003

© 2003-2013 www.clean-image.co.uk car valeting , auto detailing, car care, & smart repair.
New Again, The Car Wash, New Street, Chelmsford, Essex. CM1 1GJ :: 01245 350035

AutoGlym | Supagard | Diamondbrite